The Stages of Venture Capital

Venture Capital pic
Venture Capital
Image: investopedia.com

A devoted father of two, Bill Malloy is an investment professional with years of experience in real estate investments and venture capitalism. Currently, Bill Malloy serves as a Board Member and president of the investment firm Malloy & Company. In addition, Mr. Malloy is the founding general partner of Sway Ventures, a venture capital firm that invests in early to mid-stage technology companies.

A form of active equity financing, venture capital is a generally utilized by young firms in a high growth stage. The venture capital process begins with the submission of a business plan. This plan, submitted by a startup firm to a venture capitalist, helps to determine if the firm meets the requirements of the investment fund. A period of due diligence follows, which involves the completion of an in-depth analysis of the firm’s finances, operations, and management structure. The venture capitalist then decides whether or not to make an investment offer. If an offer is made, the venture capitalist then plays an active role in the ongoing strategic operations of the startup firm. The process eventually ends with the exit of the venture capitalist from an ownership role via a merger, acquisition, or initial public offering.

USC Trojan’s Impressive Recruiting Class

USC Trojans

 

A California-based entrepreneur, Bill Malloy seeks out and invests in promising tech startup companies and leverages his financial capital to support numerous philanthropic organizations. An alumnus of the University of Southern California, Bill Malloy proudly supports the school’s football team.

Although the college football season came to an end in January, excitement for the following season typically ramps up in February thanks to hundreds of high school players nationwide declaring their college intentions. And after winning the Rose Bowl in 2016, the future continues to look bright for the USC Trojans, which, according to several media outlets, had one of the best high school recruiting classes in the country. Incoming freshman are ranked on a five-star scale, and USC’s 23 commits included a pair of five-star players and 12 four-star athletes.

The team’s top recruit was running back Stephen Carr, a California native who was ranked as the third-best high school back in the country. The Trojans also added high-profile recruits such as offensive lineman Austin Jackson and Los Angeles-born wide receivers Joseph Lewis and Greg Johnson. The Trojans added 14 of ESPN’s top 300 high school recruits and six of the top 100.

Surfing in Hawaii Originated Hundreds of Years Ago

Hawaii
Hawaii

 

Venture capitalist Bill Malloy divides his time between serving as a founding general partner at Sway Ventures and acting as a board member and observer for numerous companies. Outside of his professional responsibilities, Bill Malloy enjoys surfing with his friends and founders from San Francisco.

One of the oldest sports practiced on the planet, surfing dates back to Hawaii in the 15th century. It is believed that the sport of he’enalu originated during this time. The phrase used to described the sport roughly translates to “wave-sliding.” Rather than regarding the activity as an attempt for humans to dominate the ocean, Hawaiians viewed it as an opportunity to commune with the sea. Surfing played a huge role in the class system in Hawaii for many years. High-class individuals had the longest boards and a reputation for being the best on the waves. They also had designated surf spots. As class status decreased, so did the size of the boards.

Although historians believe he’enalu originated in the 15th century, the first records of the sport did not appear until the late 1700s. Polynesians and Europeans made their first contact with native people in Tahiti during these years and witnessed them riding on the waves. Meanwhile, visitors to Hawaii witnessed the same activity. Unfortunately, surfing fell to the wayside along with many Hawaiian traditions thanks to European diseases and missionaries.

During the next several centuries, some Hawaiians continued surfing, and the sport experienced a re-growth in popularity. Native Hawaiians established a surf club in 1905. Since then, the sport has grown and spread around the world.

Marshall Business School Offers Real Estate Association

USC Marshall School of Business pic
USC Marshall School of Business
Image: marshall.usc.edu

 

Bill Malloy serves board member of Malloy & Company and general partner at /Sway Ventures. Leading up to his work with Malloy & Company, Bill Malloy earned an MBA through the Marshall School of Business. While there, he also had been involved in the Graduate Real Estate Association.

The Marshall School of Business is part of the University of Southern California. Its graduates come from many different backgrounds with varied experience. The USC Graduate Real Estate Association offers opportunities for students to learn about various facets of real estate such as law, construction, and accounting.

Students are able to join after paying a yearly fee and have access to events that take place weekly, such as the Lusk Center Speakers Series. Each meeting offers a lunch and allows students the chance to network with industry executives. Every spring, construction site visits allow students to witness guided tours of projects under construction, so they can see firsthand how they are built. There is also a Lusk Mentorship Program that is held every fall, offering students the opportunity to be paired with an executive for one year.

Things to Consider When Investing in a Startup

Investing in a Startup pic
Investing in a Startup
Image: bankrate.com

With an impressive track record of business leadership and venture investing, Bill Malloy serves as a founding general partner and investor at Sway Ventures in San Francisco, California. In this capacity, Bill Malloy oversees the company’s investments in early-stage & early-growth software companies.

When investing in a business startup, investors should consider several factors, including why they have the opportunity to invest in the startup. Most new companies seek investments simply to raise money. This is not automatically a red flag, but investors should consider that the lack of financing may suggest business struggles.

Further, investors must be aware that many startup investments do not have returns for at least a couple of years. Startups need to funnel any earned money back into the company, so returns may not appear until the business is established.

Investors can reduce risk by investing in markets they know. By investing in familiar markets, investors can better understand a company’s structure and get a more accurate idea of the business’ potential.

However, diversifying is still wise. Multiple investments increase the chance that investors will receive returns on their money.

The First Terms at USC Marshall School of Business

USC Marshall School of Business pic
USC Marshall School of Business
Image: marshall.usc.edu

A founding general partner of Sway and board member and president of Malloy & Company, Bill Malloy has built a successful career in the venture capital and private equity fields. Bill Malloy began his career after receiving an MBA degree in finance and entrepreneurship from the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business.

Offering a top-rated business education, USC Marshall extends the university’s role as a visionary and innovative leader in Southern California. Students who are part of the school’s full-time MBA program receive a well-rounded education in business.

All first-year students must complete core classes in areas such as strategy, marketing, accounting, and finance. These courses provide a strong foundational knowledge of the profession.

Following their first term, students participate in seven-week consulting assignments carried out with clients in the Los Angeles area. In the following term, students begin learning about business on an international level, comparing and contrasting business in the United States with business in other countries. The term includes a mandatory 10-day overseas trip that includes visits to selected companies around the world.